Wiring e-Cig Box Mods

Wiring e-Cig box mods is very simple. Just about all wiring for e-cigs is the same unless you are doing something fancy like a voltage regulator or something similar.  The wiring for an e-Cig mod is a basic electronic circuit.  It’ not really any more complicated than a flashlight circuit.  The only difference is that instead of a light, you have an atomizer. Below we’ll show you how it’s done.

Here is a circuit that I drew up that is the basic wiring for any e-cigarette mod, whether it be ecig box mods, flashlight e-cig mod or any other style.  It doesn’t matter what type of enclosure you are putting it in.  They are all wired the same way.  You can do a flashlight mod and basically use the same wiring the flashlight already uses but just add a push button switch instead of the normal on-off switch.  Box mods though, are a bit easier to wire due to their physical size.

ecig box mods or any or ecig mod wiringIn the circuit, you will see that the leads from the battery have a plus and a minus.  It is good practice to put your on/off switch and the pushbutton switch on the positive side of the battery (even though it really doesn’t make any difference).

The only thing that must be put in the correct way with regards to polarity (plus/minus) is the LED since the LED has a positive side and a negative side.  The atomizer has no polarity so in reality there is no negative or positive side.  It’s basically just a small coil of wire that has a higher resistance than normal wire.  That’s why it gets hot when electricity is applied to it.

Lets follow the positive lead from the battery (red wire normally).  It goes to an on/off switch is you use one.  If you don’t use one, the batteries positive red lead goes to the pushbutton switch. If you do, the red lead goes to the on/off switch.  From the on/off switch, run a wire to one side of the pushbutton switch.  From the other side of the pushbutton switch, you attach the resistor for the LED and one lead from the atomizer.

The other end of the resistor goes to the positive lead of the LED.

On the negative side of the battery, the black wire goes to the negative side of the LED and also to the other side of the atomizer.   Pretty simple really.

This is your basic e-cig box mods or general eCig wiring.

If you have any questions, just let me know.

Read more

24 comments to Wiring e-Cig Box Mods

  • harsh

    i want to make one e cig..tell me how should i make it…circuit diagram and the material required…

  • Admin

    Easy. Just follow my step by step Puck tutorial… http://puckecig.com/2011/06/how-to-build-the-puck-e-cig-battery-mod-part-1/

    or click the link at the top right under Puck tutorial that says “Puck e-Cig Tutorial – Part 1″. It tells you everything you need to know.

  • Rebecca

    Hey Puck i’ve been reading this tutorial forever and reading the ecf. I’m about to make my first mod attempt with the puck sd. SO…switches. I’m trying to find a nice small, small switch. What is the lowest rated switch that can be used safely? There is a nice little push button at madvapes but is only 0.3a 30v. I’d love to know how circuits are calculated but am having trouble finding the right info.

    • Puck

      Although there are many that like to argue about this, I have used .5 amp 125vac push buttons in my ecig mods for years now and have not had one fail yet even though many will tell you you cannot use them. I’d say try the swtich since it is rated at 30v and we’re only using 4.8v. Yeah, I don’t want to hear about it don’t work that way but people can argue all day with me about and i have never had one fail yet.

      I prefer not to go lower than .5 amps myself but you never know until you try. Radio shack has some very small push button switches rated .5 amp at 125v and I have never had one of them fail in my ecigs. These push buttons are very tiny. Here is the link to these… http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062546&filterName=Category . You can try the switches from madvapes. Just make sure that you make you mod so the swtich is replaceable and then you don’t have to worry at all. you would always be able to replace it.

      • Rebecca

        Parts should be coming this week…ordered both button styles…i’ll let you know which works best in form and function. Thanks! This is going to be fun :D

  • Hello, everything is going perfectly here and ofcourse every one is
    sharing facts, that’s in fact good, keep up writing.

  • Dave

    Hi thanks for great ideas it nessecary to have led and resistor and what is the purpose ? thanks

    • Puck

      No, not really. It’s just a visual indicator that your atomizer is being heated and producing vapor. It’s helped me sometimes when I forget to turn the on/off switch off. I happen to glance down in my shirt pocket and see the LED on… oops, I’m cooking my atty.

      So it doesn’t serve any functional purpose as far as ecig operation. It’s just a visual que that power is flowing.

  • Hey found your website and love it. I’m gathering a plan of attack to build my e-pipe. I’m a complete newb when it comes to electronics. Thank you for putting such awesome information out here for people learning how to create a mod.

  • afiq

    i’m having trouble with my e-cig. i got 4 letter on board which is K , L , V , F and 4wire that is red , green , blue and white. i dont know where i should solder all 4 wire . i only know that the red is solder at F.Help me please

    • Puck

      What kind of board is it? Where did you get i? Any other info you may have would help.

    • ethrasher

      afig,

      I have a similar type of battery that I have had to re solder the leads many times. If you have an apollo eGo-vv, or something similar, I think I can help you.

  • I think I might be building a puck very soon, but I want to leave out the LED, and possibly try an automatic switch? Is it basically the same wiring diagram just with the suction switch (sealed into a casing) where the on/off button is on this, and the LED and reistor left out?

    • Puck

      The automatic switch replaces the push button switch (the on/off button stays). Just wire the automatic switch in place of the push button switch. If you don’t want an LED, just leave the LED and resistor out and you will be fine. Have fun :)

      One thing I might mention though is most automatic switches may not be able to handle the 2 amp current that is required to fire the atomizer. You may need a mosfet chip to control the atomizer. That’s what most of the automatic switches use in the commercial ecigs. A mosfet handles the power and your automatic switch controls the mosfet transistor. You might be able to get away with it for a while using it straight up but it may eventually burn out. Just thought I’d throw that out there.

  • Caleb S

    So if my push button switch has a ring led light on it, do I hook up positive to one side, the resistor to other side, then that resistor going to negative wire?

  • Keanu

    Hi puck, I have built my circut with a 9v batter and 22awg wire, however when I turn it on the led comes on but when I screw on the tank with it on the led just shuts off and nothing happens. Is it the wire I’m using? Should I use a smaller wire or what?

    • Puck

      Did you say a 9 volt battery? A 9 volt battery cannot supply enough current to power an ecig. You have to use at least 4 AAA NiMH (rechargeable batteries) or it will not work at all. You can use rechargeable AAA or AAs. 9 volt batteries just won’t cut it. Your wires are fine.

  • Levi

    Hey from what I understand my tank has an atomizer built in it so would I use a 510 connected to connect my BCC to the circuit? And if so is there any special wiring?

    Thanks

    • Puck

      I’m not sure I understand exactly what you are asking. Yes, a tank has an atomizer. The type of connector you need will depend on the tank atomizer type. If it uses a 510 connection, then you will need a 510 connector. If it is an ego style, you will need an ego connector. Either one does not need any special wiring but I’m not sure what you are trying to achieve. If you can provide a bit more info maybe I can help answer what you are looking to do.

  • Levi

    I guess what I’m trying to say is when I go to my local vape store and tell them I’m building one and I need an atomizer they look at me like I’m crazy and they say all they have is a 510 connector. I was reading your atomizer, cartomizer post and I have a BCC so how do I hook that up to my circuit?

    • Puck

      Does your local vape store actually sell 510 connectors? They may be telling you that all of their atomizers/cartomizers have a 510 connection. Some BCCs come with a 510 connection, some come with an ego connection. You need to tell which you have. 510 connections are small (a bit bigger than a 1/4 of an inch. Ego connections are about 1/2 of an inch and the threads are in the inside lip of the outer shell of the atomizer.

      If you have built a puck with a 510 connection and your BCC is an ego connection, you will need a 510 to ego converter which costs a couple of dollars. That’s all you would need. You have not mentioned what your “circuit” is so I really cannot tell you how to hook up to it unless I have more detail.

  • Judge

    to use a smaller button or switch you could use a digital relay. also, you are using more smaller batteries, to get a higher current, you could also even use a cell phone battery or camera batteries. just watch the voltage and Mah. if you have incorporated a current limiter the Mah won’t matter as much just as long as there is more than enough power to run the rig.

    • Puck

      I agree with all you have mentioned. To use a digital relay, you must find one that will “latch” the relay with a voltage of 3.7 or a bit less to be on the safe side.
      Cell phone batteries and camera batteries are fine as long as you have an external charger that can charge them.

      Most newer circuits in mods are running voltage doublers and then taking that output and varying the final output voltage to arrive at a higher voltage (than 3.7volts) that you can select. Most are also microprocessor controlled. Quite a task to build yourself into a small device but if you don’t care about size too much, it can be done.